High Protein and Antioxidant Smoothie

smoothie

Smoothies are a great way to pack in great vitamins, minerals and protein on the go!

The great thing about smoothies versus juicing is you get the whole fruit/vegetable instead of just the juice, which leaves out the fiber rich skin! Also smoothies are easier to make taste delicious and fill you up!

A quick recipe I like to do is a mixed fruit & peanut butter treat. I drink this mid-morning sometimes when its not lunch but breakfast hasn’t quite held me over or as an afternoon snack.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of frozen fruit
    • I used a great value back of frozen blueberries, strawberries, raspberries and cherries
  • 1 cup of skim milk
  • 1 packet of stevia or sugar
  • 1 small spoonful of peanut butter ( 1/2 tbsp)

Directions: add ingredients & blend J it’s that easy!

I say use stevia or sugar because one packet of sugar would only add around ~30calories not that detrimental and aspartame is beginning to show some not so great side effects- but that’s for another article entirely.

You don’t need ice because the frozen fruit will give you the smooth frozen texture you’re wanting without chunks of ice or the watering down of taste!

Nutritional info:

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Mediterranean Chicken Salad

medchickensaladAs you can probably tell from last recipes, I am a huge Mediterranean fan… not only am I Italian and think that Mediterranean food tastes delicious but it has been proven to reduce cardiovascular risk by raising “good” cholesterol (HDL) and lowering “bad” cholesterol (LDL), not only this but the diet is high in protein and fiber and low in saturated fat and sugar, as well as loaded with fruits and vegetables needed for all those vitamins & minerals! The med diet even includes wine… needless to say, I’m a fan!

So here is a little recipe I came up with today & find delicious!

Servings this makes: 4 servings ( 1/2c = 1 serving)

Ingredients:

  • 1 avocado
  • 4 thin chicken breasts cooked
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 apples

Salt & pepper to taste

Directions: combine all ingredients in a blender & pulse until texture is that of chicken salad. ( cut the apples and make sure to squeeze out all avocado into blender!)

I then put my chicken salad on whole wheat toast & also ate some with whole wheat pita chips as a snack!

Nutritional info:

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Question: Is cereal a good breakfast choice? What are the best cereals to choose from?

You’ll hear it again and again, breakfast is the most important meal of the day… but why? Because it is the start up button to your metabolism, it’s like putting coal or a piece of wood into the fire aka your metabolism. Once you have a nice fire going your body has the energy to do everything you need it to without breaking down other things in your body. No sluggish feeling or crankiness from not having enough energy, eat a good breakfast and you’ll be ready to tackle anything that comes tour way before noon!

So what if all that fits into your budget or time frame is cereal, how can i pick the best choice?

Written by : Laura Conway, a registered dietitian with over ten years of dietetics experience, currently working for Chartwells over the past three years providing nutrition information to various student groups, faculty groups and to individual students addressing nutrition concerns related to sports nutrition, weight loss, healthy eating, food allergies and much more.

Answer: Breakfast is really important, and sometimes all you may have time for is a bowl of cereal. Plus, it can taste really great.

The best cereals are lower in sugar and offer some whole grains (aka: fiber) to help you fill up. Even pre-sweetened cereals can be a fine choice. Many manufacturers are lowering the sugar levels in their pre-sweetened cereals. Here is what to look for: Sugar less than 10g At least 2g of fiber (more is better!) At least 2g of protein Don’t be fooled by whole grain claims-just because the box says “whole grains” it probably isn’t 100% whole grain, which means the cereal can contain very little. Look for a whole grain listed as the first ingredient for a better choice.

Question: Will getting more sleep help me eat less?

I found this unique Q/A on Auburns website written by, Laura Conway, the registered dietitian with over ten years of dietetics experience that works for this university providing nutrition information to various student groups, faculty groups and to individual students addressing nutrition concerns related to sports nutrition, weight loss, healthy eating, food allergies and much more. Laura has built nutrition and wellness programming targeted to students’ needs and worked with Chartwells team members to increase availability of healthy options in student dining.

So, Will getting more sleep help me eat less?

Answer:

Researchers at the University of Chicago think so. They did a study in 2008 of 14 healthy volunteers who participated in a sleep deprivation study with 5 1/2 hours of sleep a night for 14 nights, and then did a control group that logged 8 1/2 hours of sleep a night for 14 nights. Participants were able to eat whatever they wanted, whenever they wanted.

What the researchers found is that when the participants were restricted to 5 1/2 hours of sleep a night, they ate more snacks and more of those snacks were high in refined carbohydrates. Refined carbohydrates in particular have been studied by Walter Willett, MD at Harvard Medical School. According to Dr. Willett’s research, refined carbohydrates not only lead to obesity, but also have a link to heart disease. (Willett, Walter C. “Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy” Free Press 2005).

Another sleep study conducted by Siobhan Banks, PhD at the University of South Australia found that while appetite was suppressed in sleep deprived individuals, they still gained weight over the course of a study. Banks did not find a craving for carbohydrates as previous studies have found. Whether or not you need to eat less, getting more zzz’s will help increase your concentration and help you feel better. Try to log about 7-8 hours every night to feel and perform your best. To control your weight, spread your meals and snacks out over the time you will be awake. If you find yourself gaining weight, and staying up longer hours-your weight gain could be due to late night fourth meals.

Question: Is there anything I can eat that will help increase my energy levels? I seem to be tired all the time

SLEEEEEPY. I often feel sleepy, whether I’m having a busy day or a casual saturday… I feel like I need more energy. What do we do for energy everyday? We eat, but what we don’t realize is there are certain foods that can help to increase energy levels! I recently found a great page on Auburn University’s website that talks about common nutrition questions, this is one of the common questions asked “Question: Is there anything I can eat that will help increase my energy levels? I seem to be tired all the time.”

Answering this question is Laura Conway, the registered dietitian who works with Auburn’s food service company, Chartwells, and has over ten years of dietetics experience. She has worked for Chartwells the past three years providing nutrition information to various student groups, faculty groups and to individual students addressing nutrition concerns related to sports nutrition, weight loss, healthy eating, food

Answer: Food does play a critical role in how energetic you feel. There are several tactics you can use so the foods you eat will help you feel more energetic.

First, eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. They do not always have to be fresh-canned, frozen, fresh or dried all count because they all contain nutrients and chemicals needed for your body to make energy and protect your cells from damage from pollution, smoking, sun tanning, and more. Second, don’t eat large meals. If you wake early have something small to eat like a piece of whole wheat toast with some peanut butter. Have a banana, apple or orange a couple of hours later. Eat light at lunch-like soup and half a sandwich or a salad. Eat a light mid day snack of fruits and veggies or pretzels and peanut butter. At dinner have some fish, vegetables and brown rice and then finish off your day with some more fruit. If you eat smaller meals more frequently you will keep your blood sugar levels steady and you won’t have a slump. Third, make sure you are drinking enough. Water, 100% fruit juice, tea, coffee and milk all count. Dehydration is a common cause of fatigue. Fourth, eat more fiber. Beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains and fruits and vegetables slow the release of sugar absorbed by your body and help keep your blood sugar levels steady. Last, make sure you are getting some exercise and enough sleep. Oddly enough, too much sleep can make you more tired and exercising through fatigue can help give you more energy. The good news is that just a brisk walk can help improve energy levels dramatically so you don’t have to run a marathon.

Nutritional Powerhouse Foods

I recently stumbled upon a great page on Auburn University’s website that talks about common nutrition questions. Laura Conway is the registered dietitian who works with there food service company, Chartwells, and has over ten years of dietetics experience. She has worked for Chartwells the past three years providing nutrition information to various student groups, faculty groups and to individual students addressing nutrition concerns related to sports nutrition, weight loss, healthy eating, food allergies and much more.

I love the term “nutritional powerhouse” that Laura uses to describe foods that are packed full of vitamins and minerals!

Nutritional Powerhouse Foods:

1. Tomato Salsa-low in fat, calories and free of sodium and cholesterol this fresh made treat adds instant flavor to everything from eggs to chicken and you get a healthy dose of antioxidants too.

2.Whole Wheat Pita Bread-better than slices for holding lots of veggie fillings and still offer a healthy dose of whole grains.

3. Popcorn-buy an air popper and make your own when you don’t want to worry about portion because you can eat a lot for few calories. Add flavor with spices including cinnamon, paprika, ginger or oregano. Or add nuts and raisins for a healthy trail mix.

4. Kale-and other dark leafy greens are a great source of iron and calcium, lacking in many of our diets. The uses are virtually endless from soups to stir-fry’s.

5. Oranges-containing a days worth of Vitamin C they are essential to good health and are also low in calories and fat free.

6. Vegetable Soup-eat a bowl prior to lunch and you will consume an average of 20% fewer calories during the meal which can help control weight, not to mention that few of us eat the recommended 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day so this is a great way to get more in.

7. Plain Yogurt-loaded with calcium and protein plain yogurt keeps our intestinal systems running smoothly. Plain yogurt can be mixed with fruit and honey for a sweet treat or with spices like dill or black pepper for a tangy vegetable dip. It’s also great alone as a substitute for sour cream.

8. Hummus-made with chickpeas and olive oil, hummus is slowly digested and helps regulate your appetite all day. It’s loaded with fiber and heart healthy unsaturated fats too.

Will Carbs Make Me Fat?

I hear this question so often… carbs are SO misunderstood and I found a great answer to this question surfing Auburn’s Website Dining Hall services with my little brother.

Written by : Laura Conway, a registered dietitian with over ten years of dietetics experience, currently working for Chartwells over the past three years providing nutrition information to various student groups, faculty groups and to individual students addressing nutrition concerns related to sports nutrition, weight loss, healthy eating, food allergies and much more.

Question: Do carbs make you fat?

Answer: The technical answer is NO, carbs don’t make you fat. Excess calories make you fat. Yet, it isn’t quite so simple either. Any refined carbohydrate-white pasta, white rice, sugar-is absorbed into your bloodstream quickly and just as quickly into your cells. Once the sugar is in your cells, hormones tell your brain that your stomach is hungry again. Now this happens for a reason-your body doesn’t want to starve. But what you cannot see is that the calories from the first meal have not been expended yet. You may feel like you are starving, but in reality your smart little cells have turned those carbs into fat and stored them away for a rainy day. The result-you are hungry again even though you have eaten enough calories already.

Controlling portions is important, and whole grains are critical. But let’s look at it another way. Most Americans eat 250-300grams of carbohydrate a day, almost twice the conservative recommendation. The vast majority of this is from simple carbohydrates-sugar and refined grains—all in response to the 30 year old advice to follow a low fat diet. After all, sugar is fat free. But when you look at health outcomes, obesity, heart disease and diabetes have continued to rise. It’s not a coincidence. The Atkin’s diet is not the answer, but according to new 2010 Dietary Guidelines, we should eat more good fat-from nuts, fish, seeds and canola and olive oils-and less carbs, especially refined carbs and sugar.

More exerts to come from this awesome site!

http://www.dineoncampus.com/auburn/show.cfm?cmd=nutritionQuestions